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Showing posts from June, 2018

Chesterman, A. (2000). A causal model for translation studies.

In this paperAndrew Chesterman(2000) discusses models for translation research. He starts by explaining the differences between a theory, hypothesis, and a model. According to Chesterman, a theory is a set of concepts and statements (claims, hypotheses) that provides a systematic perspective that allows us to understand something in any way, and consequently attempt to explain it. A model, he elaborates, is less abstract, and oftentimes viewed in an intermediate position between theory and data. A model is typically used to illustrate a theory or a part of a theory. When it comes to 'Models of translation' Chesterman defines them as 'preliminary, pre-theoretical setting the object of research that has specific methodological...they constrain research models, and hence the construction of translation theories' (p. 16). 

The paper introduces four types of models of translation: 
1. Comparative model, commonly used in contrastive research, and it aligns translations with …

Consciousness and the strategic use of aids in translation.

In this paper, Juliane House (2000) discusses the role of consciousness in translation process research and provides the background for a small empirical study using thinking-aloud techniques to investigate language learners' use of translational aids.

The study analyzed and compared the thinking-aloud protocols, the retrospective interviews, and the translations produced under the two treatments with the availability versus non-availability of translational aids.

The paper concluded that TAPs might contribute to improving our understanding of translation process. However, House (2000) favors the use of dialogic against monologic TAPs and retrospective immediate interviews as the data produced by pairs of subjects were generally less artificial, richer in translational strategies and often much more interesting.

On the translation teaching side, House (2000) proposes teaching translation in and as interaction (House 1986 and forthcoming) giving preference to collaborative translation…

Uncertainty in Translation Processes

Sonja (2001) examined think-aloud protocols (TAPs) of six protocols selected from amongst twenty TAPs originating from four experiments conducted by Tirkkonen-Condit, Jääskeläinen, and Pöntinen and Romanov at Savonlinna in the late 1980's and early 1990's.

The purpose of the study was to examine uncertainty in translation processes and show that translators might display identifiable patterns (strategies) of uncertainty management.

The paper concluded that translators shared the strategy of producing tentative solutions to translation problems. In TAPs. uncertainty was verbalized by markers of a processing phenomenon and markers of uncertainty. 

This paper is a required reading for the Ph.D. in Translation Studiescandidacy exam (Comps) at the Institute for Applied Linguistics at Kent State University. This Xmind map (you can view and download by clicking the Xmind icon) provides a summary of the main concepts presented in this paper: 

Tirkkonen-Condit, Sonja. 2001. “Uncertainty in…

Are all professionals experts?

This study by Riitta Jääskeläinenlooks at the different ways of defining professionalism and expertise. It shall attempt to reinterpret the earlier findings in process studies from the point of view of expertise research. Lastly, it discusses some implications for future research.

This paper is a required reading for the Ph.D. in Translation Studiescandidacy exam (Comps) at the Institute for Applied Linguistics at Kent State University. This Xmind map (you can view and download by clicking the Xmind icon) provides a summary of the main concepts presented in this paper: 

Jääskeläinen, R. (2010). Are all professionals experts?. Translation and Cognition, 15, 213-227.






Riitta Jääskeläinen, Ph.D., is Professor of English (translation and interpreting) at the University of Eastern Finland (former University of Joensuu). Her research has focused on translation processes, with a special interest in methodology. Her dissertation Tapping the Process was published in 1999 (University of Joensuu Pu…

Shreve M. (2002) 'Knowing Translation'

This paper by Gregory M. Shreve discusses the concept of expertise in translation studies from a cognitive perspective. It highlights the differences between Novice and Expert translators. This paper is a required reading for the Ph.D. in Translation Studies candidacy exam (Comps) at the Institute for Applied Linguistics at Kent State University. This Xmind map (you can view and download by clicking the Xmind icon) provides a summary of the main concepts presented in this paper:

Shreve, Gregory. 2002. “Knowing Translation: Cognitive and Experiential Aspects of Translation Expertise from the Perspective of Expertise Studies.” Alessandra Riccardi, ed. Translation Studies: Perspectives on an Emerging Discipline. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 150–171.





Mapping the Major Approaches to Translator Training

I've been studying for my Ph.D. Candidacy exam at the Institue for Applied Linguistics at Kent State University.

One of the required readings is concerned with Pedagogy in Translation Studies. I summarised the major approaches to translator training using Xmind.  Click on the Xmind icon below to view and download.